Treatment

Treatment

Average session length from start to finish is 50 minutes. Depending on the person and the condition(s) being addressed for that person, the number of sessions will vary. Most people find that 10-20 sessions bring the level of improvement they are seeking. We recommend that sessions occur twice a week although for some weekly treatments are equally effective. Because it is a form of training, intermittent sessions are less effective.  
 

What to expect

Often times a change is noticeable after the first treatment, whereby the person feels more relaxed. For others it may take up to four sessions to notice a “shift”, which can include a clearer mind and a generally calmer sense of being. It may show up as a lower golf score or better sleeping patterns.

 

Four phases

While it is not important to understand how something works in order to benefit from it, many people are curious to know at least a bit about what is happening during a Neurofeedback session. An average session consists of four phases that are seamless over the session.
phase one: warm up
phase two: releasing and “letting go”
phase three: forging new neural pathways
phase four: cool down and integration

 

Our programs help in improving the following cognitive skills and functions:

  • Concept comprehension – understanding tasks and concepts
  • Working memory – retaining necessary information for short periods of time, yet long enough to complete specific tasks
  • Sequential processing – working with pieces of information, one after another
  • Simultaneous processing or multitasking – processing a few pieces of information at the same time
  • Attention duration – Sustaining attention for longer periods
  • Processing speed – the speed with which information is processed
  • Selective attention – focusing on one task at a time
  • Sensory motor coordination – coordinating sensory and motor skills
  • Visual processing – working with visual images
  • Auditory processing – working with sounds
  • Audio-visual coordination – working with both sound and visuals, simultaneously
  • Peripheral vision – noticing background details while focusing on a task